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The Lost Generation Poem Analysis Essays

In Our Time and the Lost Generation Essay

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In Our Time and the Lost Generation

Ernest Hemingway's In Our Time is a true representation of his "lost generation" for the simple reason that all generations are eventually lost as time goes by. Hemingway focuses on a generation he knows about, his own. It becomes apparent throughout the novel that Hemingway is deconstructing the world without overly using vast amounts of description. All of the “messages" bring the reader to an understanding of a generation, the "lost generation" that appears to result from Hemingway's novel.

Ernest Hemingway uses intense short stories to leave a feeling of awe and wonder in the reader of In Our Time. One begins to become emotionally involved and attached to Hemingway's many stories, just as…show more content…

They seem to get by on nothing else but their own company and do not adhere to any outside interference- they do not need any other means of entertainment to enhance their time together. It is just the two of them and a good bottle of whiskey- no more, no less. Hemingway's stories seem to have a vintage, old- fashioned kind of feel to them, but at the same time portray and somewhat relate to modern times. They all seem to have some kind of moral dilemma or moral awareness in them. All the characters appear to be searching for something, although they are not all consciously aware of what or where or even why fate has brought them to the place in time they are in.

"Cat in the Rain" depicts a so- called happily married couple on vacation in Spain, spending a day inside(apparently by the husband's choice) due to the bad weather. The wife seems to be searching for something to fill a void inside of her. She speaks of a cat in the rain- her answer to the nada(or so she thinks). She goes down to retrieve it but cannot find it. She tells her disinterested about the event. It is clear that it is indeed her husband that has created the void due to the lack of attention he pays to his wife. The cat is simply a metaphor for her needs. Suddenly, there is a knock at the door and a maid appears with a cat in her hands. The manager downstairs gave it to her, finally, someone who would pay her the attention she craved. This story seemed to represent the "lost generation" of love

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Literary Works Of The Lost Generation

The time after the World War I. was not the best one and why do we know it? It is partly because of the group of writers called the Lost Generation who had experienced the war and the life after and did an amazing job with giving the deep information about their time. This work deals with the characteristics of the Lost Generation’s works.
In the first part of my essay I am going to describe the postwar period’s time. In the second part I will tell you who the lost generation was. In addition I will describe a life and topics of authors whose text I selected. Next, in the third part I will emphasize the characteristic and information, I have learned from the background, in texts, then compare them and find the connections between them.

Life in the USA after World War I
After World War I the world was changed forever. During World War I was rapidly transformed by new technologies and moreover, owing to them the war had a bigger affect on people; the total number of casualties was over 37 million War had forced the generation to grow up quickly, and for those, who had spent years in trenches, war was all they really knew. “What’s to become of us?” asked one soldier to another. “We have lived this life for so long. Now we shall have to start all over again.”
The years immediately after World War I weren’t the most serene. People were not satisfied with the established social and aesthetics conventions at the time and some young artists were trying to do something about it; they gathered to big cities, such as Chicago and San Francisco, in order to protest, exploring their own set of values, the ones that clearly went against what their elders had already established, and to make a new art. Some writers no longer felt the need to stay and went to Europe, mostly to Paris.
The Lost Generation
According to Encyclopedia Britannica, The Lost Generation in general, was the post-World War I generation, but especially a group of U.S. writers who came of age during the war and established their literary reputations in 1920s.
As a centre of writers of the Lost Generation, was considered France - a Salon, in possession of Gertrude Stein. Writers met up in her Salon because they all were looking for new life assurance and new ways in art and literature. Some of them stayed in European exile for longer than others who made good use of their European experience in America.
The writers were at a young age when the World War I. broke out and the experience of this period reflects on their literature works. Except this, other characteristics are: youthful idealism, lost illusions about people and love, hostile point of view at word and also distain for humanism. The most used themes are war, love, friendships and heroism.
As writers of young and bitter ‘lost generation’ we consider, among others, Ernest Hemingway, Francis Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, John Dos Passos and William Faulkner.
Gertrude Stein
Gertrude Stein was the leading figure of the Lost...

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